Sammi Patterson: The Face of Fundraising for the Cure

Sammi Patterson has been an infant teacher at Bright Horizons childcare center in Raleigh for five years caring for children from 6 weeks to 12 months old. The center is responsible for mostly the children of North Carolina State University faculty and staff and is part of a larger corporate company dedicated to teaching children community outreach as part of its curriculum.

Sammi also donates her time as a member of the Triangle Race for the Cure Planning Committee. She started participating in 2008, right after she moved from the North Carolina mountains to Raleigh because of a friend who was very involved.

She first presented the idea of the childcare center getting involved with the Triangle Race for the Cure at a staff meeting back in 2011. That year, only staff volunteered as an “I am the Cure” cheerleading team for the Race. But in 2012, the staff decided to join together with its children and their parents to raise money for breast cancer by creating a Race team – Bright Horizons Community Champions for the Cure. While brainstorming fundraising ideas, they wanted to make sure to teach the children how to be responsible members of the community.

“In our center, part of our curriculum is that we make sure the children are 100% involved in anything we do for the community. We decided to do a bake sale team fundraiser so the kids can put in an effort and see the result at the Race,” Sammi said.

Childcare Infant teacher Sammi Patterson selling baked goods and a cookbook illustrated by the center’s children as a fundraiser for her Triangle Race for the Cure team. She is also a member of the Race Planning Committee.

Each age group made muffins, cookies, cupcakes and other goodies to sell at the bake sale. A couple weeks before the Race the center celebrates Pink Day and sets up a table in the building’s lobby during drop-off and pick-up times selling the baked goods. During Pink Day, teachers and the children wear pink and decorate the entire center in the color.

This year, will mark the business’ 3rd annual bake sale. Since its first sale in 2012, the team has raised close to $3000. New this year, the center is selling a cookbook with recipes illustrated by the children and donated by their parents. Fundraising is currently in effect and based on what is raised, the center’s director has agreed to go down a slip and slide with shaving cream or kiss a farm animal.

“It costs $100 for a woman to get a mammogram. Through our fundraising efforts over the last few years, we raised enough for almost 30 uninsured women to get mammograms,” Sammi said.
Following last year’s Race for the Cure, Sammi asked one of the center’s four-year-olds who had participated in the event if she understood the Race’s purpose.  The preschooler responded, “It was to help women live.”

Sammi was proud that the young child understood that their fundraising efforts and participation in the Race helps women in our community, “The children being able to make that connection and see the results of their efforts is why we participate each year,” said Sammi.

Each age group made muffins, cookies, cupcakes and other goodies to sell at the bake sale. A couple weeks before the Race the center celebrates Pink Day and sets up a table in the building’s lobby during drop-off and pick-up times selling the baked goods. During Pink Day, teachers and the children wear pink and decorate the entire center in the color.

This year, will mark the business’ 3rd annual bake sale. Since its first sale in 2012, the team has raised close to $3000. New this year, the center is selling a cookbook with recipes illustrated by the children and donated by their parents. Fundraising is currently in effect and based on what is raised, the center’s director has agreed to go down a slip and slide with shaving cream or kiss a farm animal.

“It costs $100 for a woman to get a mammogram. Through our fundraising efforts over the last few years, we raised enough for almost 30 uninsured women to get mammograms,” Sammi said.
Following last year’s Race for the Cure, Sammi asked one of the center’s four-year-olds who had participated in the event if she understood the Race’s purpose.  The preschooler responded, “It was to help women live.”

sammi-pattersonSammi was proud that the young child understood that their fundraising efforts and participation in the Race helps women in our community, “The children being able to make that connection and see the results of their efforts is why we participate each year,” said Sammi.

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